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Statement from National Endowment for the Arts Chairman Jane Chu

Today we learned that the President’s FY 2018 budget blueprint proposes the elimination of the National Endowment for the Arts. We are disappointed because we see our funding actively making a difference with individuals of all ages in thousands of communities, large, small, urban and rural, and in every Congressional District in the nation.

We understand that the President’s budget request is a first step in a very long budget process; as part of that process we are working with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to prepare information they have requested. At this time, the NEA continues to operate as usual and will do so until a new budget is enacted by Congress.

We expect this news to be an active topic of discussion among individuals and organizations that advocate for the arts. As a federal government agency, the NEA cannot engage in advocacy, either directly or indirectly. We will, however, continue our practice of educating about the NEA’s vital role in serving our nation’s communities.

 

 

Planning Strategies to Protect NEA

 

CT Arts Alliance Seeks Administrator

CAA Administrator Description

Part-time: 16-20 hours/mo. or roughly 240 hours annually maximum (2017 would be for 9 mos. or 140 hrs max.)

Reports to the CAA Board President

  1. I) Administration
  • Provide administrative support to President for material related to board meetings
  • Work with Treasurer to develop and track budget
  • Coordinate strategic planning with board
  • Monitor and update website
  • Report to grantees
  • Interface with cultural and nonprofit partners, and state and national advocacy organizations
  1. II) Arts Day
  • Help formulate and implement follow through to Arts Day 2017 in coordination with the CT Office of the Arts
  • In concert with CT Office of the Arts and other partners, coordinate Arts Day 2018 with a goal of increased engagement and participation levels and partnerships

III) Membership

  • Build membership program and work with DRSO’s to implement
  • Coordinate Calls to Action eblasts, etc.

Qualifications

Excellent communications skills; knowledge of electronic communications using email service providers; proficiency with Microsoft Office Suite, particularly Excel; strong time management and organization skills; ability to work with a diverse group of professionals; experience with nonprofit organizations necessary. Remote position.

Because this is a new position, scope of duties may change according to organization’s needs.

TO APPLY

Please submit your resume and cover letter by March 3rd to: awhitford03@gmail.com.

Federal Funding Update from NEFA

NEFA Blog post

Save the Date: Connecticut Arts Day March 2, 2017 Hartford

Register Now!f3f60193-3598-4a59-b3e0-400aec51b911

March 22, 2016

FIRST ARTS DAY AT THE CAPITOL IN 20 YEARS A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS

image001A crowd of more than 350 arts workers, arts advocates, high-school students, performers, legislators and government officials celebrated the power of the arts to transform individual lives and stimulate the state’s economy at the first CT Arts Day in 20 years. Kristina Newman-Scott, Director of Culture for the State of CT, pushed for the concept of this gathering and rallied the indefatigable team at the Office of the Arts to make it happen.  The Office of the Arts collaborated with other organizations, including the Connecticut Arts Alliance and the nine regional cultural councils in the state.

“One of the outstanding and unforgettable aspects of this day-long gathering was hearing passionate testimony from our elected representatives about the transformative power of the arts,” stated Kristina Newman-Scott. From DECD Commissioner Catherine Smith to Lieutenant Governor Nancy Wyman, who declared March 2nd CT Arts Day permanently, to Senators Beth Bye, Bob Duff, Tony Hwang, Representatives Robyn Porter and Matt Ritter – all testified to the power of the arts in their lives, to the arts being significantly instrumental in the state’s economy, and to the critical importance of intensifying the presence of the arts in our schools. Representative Roberta Willis also spoke up during a panel discussion, emphasizing the importance of the arts and how the regional cultural councils keep their communities connected with the arts.  Lt. Gov. Wyman in particular strongly endorsed the concept of STEAM (adding the arts to STEM curriculum).

Jay Dick from the Americans for the Arts in Washington DC spoke to the crowd about the economic impact of the arts, pointing out that the arts sector is the second, only to government, in Connecticut regarding number of employees.  Artist Titus Kaphar shared his story of struggling through the educational system only to bloom later as a successful artist graduating from Yale.  Theo Edmunds, co-founder of Ideas  XLab, gave the keynote address, which was sponsored by Cigna, at the end of the day, relaying instances when artists have made an impact in various non-arts industries and sectors.

Two workshops – one on advocacy and one on economic impact – were standing room only.  There were performances sprinkled throughout the scheduled gatherings, including dance, poetry, song, and theater.  There were different speed-presentations given by artists and organizations in three groups of six from throughout the state, telling with slide-shows, stories of how they approached transformative community projects and programs.  In addition to the scheduled activities, attendees networked with one another and found information about the Office of the Arts, the Office of Preservation, the CT Arts Alliance and the nine regional cultural councils.

Connecticut Arts Day was presented by the CT Office of the Arts in collaboration with the Connecticut Arts Alliance, Arts Council of Greater New Haven, Arts & Culture Collaborative of Waterbury, Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County, Cultural Alliance of Western Connecticut, Greater Hartford Arts Council, Northwest Connecticut Arts Council, Shoreline Arts Alliance,   Southeastern Connecticut Cultural Coalition, and Windham Arts.

OP-Ed piece from the Danbury News Times
http://www.newstimes.com/opinion/article/Ted-Killmer-Moving-the-arts-from-nice-to-6886304.php

Connecticut Arts Day

The Connecticut Office of the Arts in partnership with our nine Designated Regional Service Organizations, The Culture and Tourism Advisory Committee, The Connecticut Arts Council and the Connecticut Arts Alliance is organizing the first State hosted Arts Day in over a decade. Connecticut Arts Day, “Moving the Arts from Nice to Necessary” will be held on March 2, 2016, 9 a.m – 4 p.m., and will bring together a broad cross section of policy makers, arts, cultural and creative industry organizations and individuals from across Connecticut to the State Capitol.

The Connecticut Office of the Arts has been investing in Connecticut’s arts economy for over 50 years and this is your opportunity to join us to celebrate the significant role that the arts have and continue to play in our state.

Registration is now open, however, space is limited so please reserve your tickets early. Click here to register

January 7, 2016

FEDERAL FUNDING VICTORIES 

December brought some great federal funding news.   Thanks to Americans for the Arts for this update:

The budget for the NEA was increased to $147.949 million – to the President’s request. Earlier this year, both the U.S. Senate and U.S. House proposals were to level-fund the NEA for the fifth year in a row, but the success of the 2-year budget agreement to “raise the caps” enabled additional funding to reach the agency.

The budget for the U.S. Department of Educations’ Arts in Education program also increased to $27 million—a $2 million increase. In recent years this program had received level-funding and had also seen proposals for termination, but arts advocates once again made the case and in the next authorization beginning in Fiscal Year 2017, it continues under the “Assistance for Arts Education” program enacted under ESSA- the Every Student Succeeds Act, now signed into law.

On charitable giving, the non-profit arts community has been pursuing making permanent the IRA Charitable Rollover for over decade. Permanence will give certainty and spur new and increased charitable donations to social service programs, religious organizations, arts and culture institutions, schools, healthcare providers, and the full array of nonprofits that serve Americans every day. The eligibility in the agreement is the same as previous law: 70 ½ years of age and a maximum of up to $100,000 given directly to a charity of choice per taxpayer in any tax year.

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