Connecticut Arts Generate $797.3 Million in Economic Activity

AEP5-graphic_titleAs Connecticut’s leaders continue to debate the fate of the state’s budget, the Connecticut Arts Alliance is drawing attention to recently released economic impact data. According to the Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 study, conducted by Americans for the Arts, Connecticut’s nonprofit arts and culture industry generates $797.3 million in annual economic activity in the state, supporting over 23,000 full-time equivalent jobs and generating $72.3 million in local and state government revenues. The most comprehensive economic impact study of the nonprofit arts and culture industry ever conducted in the United States, Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 was conducted by Americans for the Arts, the nation’s leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education.

Results show that nonprofit arts and culture organizations in Connecticut spent over $515 million during 2015. This spending is far-reaching: organizations pay employees, purchase supplies, contract for services, and acquire assets within their community. Those dollars, in turn, generated nearly $525 million in household income for local residents and $72.3 million in local and state government revenues.

“Arts and culture is an economic engine that clearly provides ‘food on the table’ for many who work in the sector and those who work in the many industries that are supported by the sector,” stated Amy Wynn, president of the Connecticut Arts Alliance, the state-wide arts advocacy organization for Connecticut. “The data proves that our sector provides a solid return on investment as far as state arts funding, resulting in state and local revenues that are so important to Connecticut now and in the future. The arts sector is an accessible and cost-effective asset that connects, collaborates and impacts other sectors such as healthcare, public safety, education, social services, innovation in business, manufacturing and science, and much more,” she added.

“The arts are a fundamental component of a thriving economy. From a numbers perspective the arts generate jobs, cultural tourism, and economic impact. Less quantifiable but equally as valuable: art helps to create community identity and vibrancy, and is critical to attracting and retaining an innovative workforce,” said Kristina Newman-Scott, Director of Culture of Connecticut Office of the ArtsDepartment of Economic and Community Development. “I believe we have an enormous responsibility to the creators and consumers in the state to protect the legacy of the arts in Connecticut and help foster growth in the creative economy,” she added.

Arts Industry Boon for Local Businesses

In addition to spending by organizations, the nonprofit arts and culture industry nationally leverages $102.5 billion in event-related spending by local and out-of-state audiences.  As a result of attending a cultural event, attendees often eat dinner in local restaurants, pay for parking, buy gifts and souvenirs, and pay a babysitter. What’s more, attendees from out-of-town often stay overnight in a local hotel.  Nationally, event attendees spend an average of $31.47 on event-related expenses, and that does not include the price of a ticket.  In Connecticut, the figure is $27.70 per event attendee, with residents spending $23.78 on average and visitors spending 53% more than residents – $49.78 per event attendee. In Connecticut, 69% of visitors come for arts and cultural offerings.

Economic Impact One-Page Summaries

State of Connecticut: PDF

Middlesex County: PDF

Southeastern Connecticut: PDF

Fairfield County: PDF

Northwest Connecticut Region: PDF

Greater New Haven County: PDF

The National Picture

Nationwide, the Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 reveals that the nonprofit arts industry produces $166.3 billion in economic activity

in 2015, resulting in $27.5 billion in federal, state and local tax revenues. In addition, it supports 4.6 million full-time equivalent jobs and generates $96.07 billion in household income.

“This study demonstrates that the arts are an economic and employment powerhouse both locally and across the nation,” said Robert L. Lynch, president and CEO of Americans for the Arts. “A vibrant arts and culture industry helps local businesses thrive and helps local communities become stronger and healthier places to live. Leaders who care about community and economic vitality can feel good about choosing to invest in the arts. Nationally as well as locally, the arts mean business.”

The Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 study was conducted by Americans for the Arts and supported by The Ruth Lilly Fund of Americans for the Arts. Americans for the Arts’ local, regional, and statewide project partners contributed both time and financial support to the study. Financial information from organizations was collected in partnership with DataArts™, using a new online survey interface. For a full list of the communities who participated in the Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 study, visit www.AmericansForTheArts.org/AEP5Partners.

Advertisements

CT Arts Alliance Appoints New Administrator

Facebook logoThe Board of Directors of the Connecticut Arts Alliance (CAA) is pleased to announce that Darren Farrington has been appointed the first Administrator of the advocacy organization and has begun in the position this summer.

“I’m thrilled to have been selected as the first administrator for the CAA, and I’m prepared to take on the challenge of increasing the visibility, the efforts, and the impact of this organization in this new chapter of its history. It’s exciting to me too that this position combines my passion and experience in the arts with the advocacy skills I learned and used as an attorney.”

Farrington is a theater producer, director, and consultant who has worked in professional, community, and youth theaters for over two decades. Among the theaters and organizations that he has worked with are Manhattan Theatre Club, the Alliance of Resident Theatres/New York, the Warner Theatre in Torrington, and several small companies in New York City. Currently, he is Executive and Artistic Director of New Britain Youth Theater, and he will continue in that position while also with the CAA. As an arts management consultant, Farrington has worked with several Connecticut nonprofits independently and as an advisor for the Peer Advisor Network of the Connecticut Office of the Arts.

Farrington earned a Master of Fine Arts degree from Columbia University School of the Arts in Theater Management and Production. He is also a non-practicing attorney with a degree from Fordham University School of Law, and his past practice included entertainment law, commercial litigation, and appeals. He received his undergraduate degree from the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts, where his activities included serving as president of an extracurricular theater group and as mentor for bilingual inner-city children. Darren is a native of Litchfield County, where he again resides with his wife and daughter.

The CAA was founded in 2005 as an advocacy organization to ensure that the arts remain central to life in Connecticut. The organization strives to promote and underscore the value of all achievements of the arts industry and all of the ways in which the arts improve daily life for residents of the State. Among its most visible programs are assisting with workshops for the annual Connecticut Arts Day at the Capitol organized by the Connecticut Office of the Arts, and providing advocacy guidance and resources in concert with the Office of the Arts and regional arts service organizations. The Administrator will work with the CAA Board of Directors to foster public education and awareness of the arts, to increase funding for the arts, and to influence public funding decisions and actions that affect the arts.

48-Hour Advocacy Push to Save the State Arts Budget!

Join the Connecticut Arts Alliance in an important 48-hour advocacy push on June 5 and 6 in support of continued State arts funding. Please do what you can to take part, and please share this with other friends and supporters of the arts, encouraging them to participate too. Easy-to-follow instructions and a unified message appear below.

THE PLAN:
The budget process is no small challenge, but we cannot keep quiet for fear of very real damage to the arts sector in Connecticut.

CALL TO ACTION:
Please help the voice of the arts be heard by getting the message below to both the State’s Administration and the Legislature.

WHEN:
Please take this specific action during the 48 HOURS of June 5 & 6, 2017.

WHO:
For your convenience, a list of legislative and administrative leaders appears at the bottom of this message, along with their contact information.

CAA_CTArtsMatter (revised)

PLEASE GET THIS MESSAGE TO STATE GOVERNMENT LEADERS:

CT Arts Matter!

  • The CT FY18 & FY19 budgets MUST INCLUDE funding for the ARTS COMMISSION (the Connecticut Office of the Arts).

Without this funding, Connecticut will:

  • lose valued Federal Matching Funds
  • lose much needed state revenue

We ask that you:

  • Fund the State “Arts Commission” line (Connecticut Office of the Arts) which leverages vital Federal NEA (National Endowment for the Arts) matching funds.
  • Support maintaining total arts funding of $5,183,087 (less than 0.02% of the proposed budget)

And keep in mind:

  • For every State dollar invested in the Arts, $7 in state revenue is generated. The arts are good for Connecticut’s economy!
  • The arts sector employed over 57,000 people in the arts and cultural industries in 2014, which represented 3.4% of all employment in the state.  The arts industry led utilities and transportation in both compensation and employment.

Thank you for your consideration!

More information on the advocacy positions of the Connecticut Arts Alliance is on its website HERE.

More information on the impact of the arts on the economy is on the Office of the Arts website HERE.

PLEASE EMAIL OR CALL 4 OR MORE OF THOSE LISTED BELOW:

EXECUTIVE BRANCH

Governor Malloy   governor.malloy@ct.gov   860-566-4840
Lt. Governor Nancy Wyman   ltgovernor.wyman@ct.gov   860-524-7384
DECD Commissioner Catherine Smith   Catherine.Smith@ct.gov

AND LEGISLATIVE LEADERSHIP

Sen. Len Fasano   Len.Fasano@cga.ct.gov   860-240-8871
Sen. Martin Looney   Looney@senatedems.ct.gov   860-240-0375
Sen. Paul Formica   paul.formica@cga.ct.gov   860-240-8371
Sen. Cathy Osten   Catherine.Osten@cga.ct.gov   860-240-0579
Rep. Toni Walker   toni.walker@cga.ct.gov   860-240-8585
Sen. Joan Hartley   hartley@senatedems.ct.gov   860-240-0006
Sen. Craig Miner   Craig.Miner@cga.ct.gov   860-240-8816
Rep. Henry Genga   henry.genga@cga.ct.gov   860-240-8585
Rep. Ezequiel Santiago   ezequiel.santiago@cga.ct.gov   860-240-8585
Rep. Chris Soto   Chris.Soto@cga.ct.gov   860-240-8585
Rep. Melissa Ziobron   Melissa.Ziobron@housegop.ct.gov   860-240-8700

AND FIND YOUR OWN LEGISLATORS HERE!

 

Act Now #CT Arts Matter

CAA_V2.jpg

CAA Policy Statement Re: Proposed State Budget

Connecticut Arts Alliance 2017 POSITION STATEMENT

PERSPECTIVE ON the STATE BUDGET and the OFFICE OF THE ARTS

Call to Action:

Contact your legislators and request:

  • Support maintaining total arts funding of $5,183,087 (less than .02% of proposed budget)
  • Fund State “Arts Commission” (Connecticut Office of the Arts) which will leverage Federal NEA matching funds.

Activate constituents on social media to support arts funding – use #CTArtsMatter

Background Information and Supporting Data

Significant deductions in arts funding over the past ten years (over 50% in cuts from 2008 to 2017) have weakened the State’s cultural capacity and caused organizations to close, as well as eliminate jobs and programs.  Continued reductions to arts funding will further weaken the State’s cultural capacity at a time when it is most essential for near-term statewide economic recovery.   Decreasing funding will cause further loss of jobs and programs at a time when cultural assets are critical tools to help protect the quality-of-life safety net, provide critical educational support for public schools, strengthen tourism in the face of increased out-of-state competition, and attract new innovative businesses and jobs.

  • Over 22 million people per year experience Connecticut’s cultural attractions.
  • The arts and culture sector generates $3.8 billion in gross state product
  • There is a 1 to 7 multiplier for every dollar arts organizations receive from state funding
  • Like for-profit entities, these organizations maximize limited resources to sustain and grow operations. Yet, they are rooted in Connecticut’s communities and will not relocate to take advantage of more desirable business incentives.
  • 9% out of state visitors say that cultural attractions are the primary reason for their visit.
  • Students involved with arts programs are three times more likely to be recognized for academic achievement, high attendance, and participation in a math or science fair, and low-income students in arts programs are four times more likely to excel in these areas.
  • Connecticut’s arts and cultural organizations employ 40,000 people in 18,314 full-time equivalent jobs.

State Budget Recommendations:

To best support the social, cultural, educational and economic revitalization of Connecticut moving forward, the Board of CAA urges the General Assembly and the Administration to consider the following recommendations regarding the State Budget:

  1. Restore, over time, the total state arts funding to the levels of 2008 ($10,000,000) and to currently support total state arts funding at $5,183,087. This total prevents further cuts to the funding for arts and heritage line item organizations, as well as supports the Governor’s proposed increase of $554,217 to the Office of the Arts (“Arts Commission” line in the budget). This total also represents less than .02 % of the proposed State budget total.
  2. Support the Connecticut Office of the Arts (listed as “Arts Commission”) and its diverse initiatives. The “Arts Commission” is a 51-year old state agency that is currently under the Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD), and is referred to as the Connecticut Office of the Arts (COA).  It administers grant-making programs and operational funding that are critical to overall health of the arts sector in Connecticut, and which bring in National Endowment for the Arts matching funds. In addition to grants, COA supports statewide arts education initiatives (including HOT Schools), professional development, workforce development, creative sector research, special projects focused on underserved and rural communities, poet laureate and state troubadour programs, and the Poetry Out Loud initiative.
  3. Change the way allocations are made from the Connecticut Arts Endowment Fund. CAA endorses Connecticut Bill 7226, which will enable the Arts Endowment Fund to operate more productively and more similarly to standard endowment funds at no additional expense to the state budget.
  1. Support state bonding to finance the capital improvement, restoration and modernization of cultural facilities.

 

 

Urge Congress to support the NEA

saveblueTake Action Now

art-works-inside-logo

Statement from National Endowment for the Arts Chairman Jane Chu

Today we learned that the President’s FY 2018 budget blueprint proposes the elimination of the National Endowment for the Arts. We are disappointed because we see our funding actively making a difference with individuals of all ages in thousands of communities, large, small, urban and rural, and in every Congressional District in the nation.

We understand that the President’s budget request is a first step in a very long budget process; as part of that process we are working with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to prepare information they have requested. At this time, the NEA continues to operate as usual and will do so until a new budget is enacted by Congress.

We expect this news to be an active topic of discussion among individuals and organizations that advocate for the arts. As a federal government agency, the NEA cannot engage in advocacy, either directly or indirectly. We will, however, continue our practice of educating about the NEA’s vital role in serving our nation’s communities.

 

 

Planning Strategies to Protect NEA